Matt Connors at Canada NY

Taking the history of painting, particularly 20th century modernism as one major influence, painter Matt Connors shapes color and form into optical experience in new paintings at Canada NY on the Lower East Side. (On view through Dec 10th).

Matt Connors, Yet to be titled, oil, acrylic and colored pencil on canvas, 35 ¼ x 31 ¼ inches, 2017.

Annie Pootoogook in ‘Akunnittinni; A Kinngait Family Portrait’ at the National Museum of the American Indian

The late Canadian Inuk artist Annie Pootoogook’s domestic scenes are sometimes tranquil, sometimes violent, but this portrait drawing of her grandmother, the artist Pitseolak Ashoona, radiates calm. (On view at the National Museum of the American Indian through Jan 8th).

Annie Pootoogook, A Portrait of Pitseolak, colored pencil and ink on paper, ’03 – ’04.

Veronika Pausova at Simone Subal Gallery

Geometry rules this painting by Toronto-based painter Veronika Pausova, who alludes to domestic environments by picturing curtains, cupboards and flower vases in still life paintings that are both tranquil and tense. This standout from her current show at Simone Subal Gallery, titled ‘Neighbour,’ suggests a nosy neighbor twitching her stylish curtains or the reverse – a neighbor tantalizingly out of our view. (On the Lower East Side through July 28th).

Veronika Pausova, Neighbour, oil on canvas, 36 x 30 inches, 2017.

Elizabeth McIntosh at Canada

Female figures in long black dresses are the basis of this arresting canvas by Canadian painter Elizabeth McIntosh, who’s known for excerpting and riffing on elements of historical paintings. The identity of the repeated woman is a mystery, but the intensely yellow object coming from her hand – a notebook? handbag? a block of butter? – is the real puzzle that gives the painting intrigue. (At Canada on the Lower East Side through Oct 23rd).

Elizabeth McIntosh, Black Dress, oil on canvas, 85 x 75 inches, 2016.
Elizabeth McIntosh, Black Dress, oil on canvas, 85 x 75 inches, 2016.

Libby Rothfeld in ‘Daydream from 2013’ at Canada New York

Neatly tiled platforms suggest a clean and ordered place while glasses with red sticks hint at incense offerings in New York artist Libby Rothfeld’s evocative ‘Option #1,’ currently at Canada New York on the Lower East Side. The setup entices us to make up our own story – one in which a fragile crown sporting a fairy-like face might find its way to an Asian supermarket shopping basket filled with potatoes… (Through August 26th).

Libby Rothfeld, Option #1, tile, grout, cement, porcelain, potatoes, glassware, rock, 33 x 36 x 21 inches, 2016.
Libby Rothfeld, Option #1, tile, grout, cement, porcelain, potatoes, glassware, rock, 33 x 36 x 21 inches, 2016.