Roger Steffens & The Family Acid at Benrubi Gallery

Wild abandon meets danger in this 1974 photo by counterculture photographer Roger Steffens, though what appears to be a fatal leap is an illusion – the young woman landed safely on the ledge directly beneath her. Under the titled ‘The Family Acid,’ Steffens’ photos chronicle the lives of his friends and family as they embody the changing mores of an era. (At Benrubi Gallery in Chelsea through Aug 26th).

The Family Acid, Roger Steffens, Big Sur Plunge (Clare’s Leap), March, 1974, edition of 8, archival pigment print, 24 x 20 inches.
The Family Acid, Roger Steffens, Big Sur Plunge (Clare’s Leap), March, 1974, edition of 8, archival pigment print, 24 x 20 inches.

Libby Rothfeld in ‘Daydream from 2013’ at Canada New York

Neatly tiled platforms suggest a clean and ordered place while glasses with red sticks hint at incense offerings in New York artist Libby Rothfeld’s evocative ‘Option #1,’ currently at Canada New York on the Lower East Side. The setup entices us to make up our own story – one in which a fragile crown sporting a fairy-like face might find its way to an Asian supermarket shopping basket filled with potatoes… (Through August 26th).

Libby Rothfeld, Option #1, tile, grout, cement, porcelain, potatoes, glassware, rock, 33 x 36 x 21 inches, 2016.
Libby Rothfeld, Option #1, tile, grout, cement, porcelain, potatoes, glassware, rock, 33 x 36 x 21 inches, 2016.

Duke Riley at the Queens Museum of Art

Located in the same room as the Queens Museum’s model of New York City’s water system, Duke Riley’s ‘That’s What She Said’ is a commissioned work warning against misuse of a precious natural resource. To the left, an Egyptian goddess creates the waters that flow down into a landscape destroyed by power plants and the indifference of its inhabitants. (Through Jan 1, 2017).

Duke Riley, installation view of ‘That’s What She Said,’ at the Queens Museum of Art, July 2016.
Duke Riley, installation view of ‘That’s What She Said,’ at the Queens Museum of Art, July 2016.

Sopheap Pich at Tyler Rollins Fine Art

Sopheap Pich’s bamboo and rattan flower is made of natural materials but resembles computer-generated imagery. In fact, this flower – from the cannonball tree – has personal meaning to the artist. It represents the tree that sheltered Buddha during his birth and is found near Buddhist temples and Pich’s home. (At Tyler Rollins Fine Art in Chelsea through Aug 26th).

Sopheap Pich, Rang Phnom Flower No. 2, bamboo, rattan, metal wire, approx. 85 ½ x 43 ¼ x 20 inches.
Sopheap Pich, Rang Phnom Flower No. 2, bamboo, rattan, metal wire, approx. 85 ½ x 43 ¼ x 20 inches.

Paul Outerbridge at Bruce Silverstein Gallery

Influential for his photographs of consumer culture items isolated and made strange, as well as his laborious tri-color Carbo printing technique, Paul Outerbridge is currently celebrated at Bruce Silverstein with a retrospective including this intensely colored cinematic homage to spring. (At Bruce Silverstein Gallery in Chelsea through Sept 17th).

Paul Outerbridge, First Robin of Spring, Carbo print, 14 3/8 x 10 5/8 inches, 1938, printed c. 1938.
Paul Outerbridge, First Robin of Spring, Carbo print, 14 3/8 x 10 5/8 inches, 1938, printed c. 1938.