Francis Upritchard and Martino Gamper at Anton Kern Gallery




Sculptor Francis Upritchard and her designer husband Martino Gamper ask in a collaborative installation of their respective work, just what you’d do if a scrawny spinosaurus were to run across your dining table? Gamper’s playful patterning and richly colored fabrics and Upritchard’s quirky dinosaur cast the scenario in whimsy and pull out a chair for us to join in. (At Anton Kern Gallerythrough Feb 20th).

Francis Upritchard, Paper Spinosaurous, papier-mache, metal armature and modeling, 30 x 101 9/16 x 18 1/8 inches, 2014. Martino Gamper, Black and White Table, linoleum, blockboard, walnut, 107 x ¾ x 39 2/3 inches, 2015. Ice Cream Chairs, steel structure and upholstery, 19 ½ x 15 ¾ x 32 ½ inches, 2015.


John Riepenhoff at Marlborough Gallery




How can an artist pay homage to his/her influencers? John Riepenhoff’s ‘Group Show’ walks the line between flattery and offense by recreating artworks in the style of his contemporaries and predecessors. At the show’s entrance, legs make a stand for a space-bending geometric abstraction (actually painted) by Susie Rosmarin. (At Chelsea’s Marlborough Gallery through Feb 6th).

John Riepenhoff, Art Stand (legs), wood, wire, cloth, shoes, fiberglass and clamp, 50 x 14 x 26 inches, 2014. Susie Rosmarin, Grey and White (painting), acrylic on canvas, 48 x 48 inches, 2015.


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Tauba Auerbach at Paula Cooper Gallery




Certain ornamental patterns – waves, helices – appear across cultures, perhaps pointing to fundamental structures of our universe. New York artist Tauba Auerbach delves into these forms in a display of sculptures with rotating shapes titled ‘Altar/Engine.’ Like a display of sacred objects or an explosion diagram of an engine, these 3D printed shapes relate to twisting wave forms inscribed in the paintings behind. (At Chelsea’s Paula Cooper Gallerythrough Feb 13th).

Tauba Auerbach, Altar/Engine (foreground), 3D printed nylon and plastic, an array of several dozen parts ranging from 18 x 18 x 10 inches, 2015.


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Tauba Auerbach at Paula Cooper Gallery




Certain ornamental patterns (waves, helices) appear across cultures, perhaps pointing to fundamental structures of our universe. New York artist Tauba Auerbach delves into these forms in a display of sculptures with rotating shapes titled ‘Altar/Engine.’ Like a display of sacred objects or an explosion diagram of an engine, these 3D printed shapes relate to twisting wave forms inscribed in the paintings behind. (At Chelsea’s Paula Cooper Gallery through Feb 13th).

Tauba Auerbach, Altar/Engine (foreground), 3D printed nylon and plastic, an array of several dozen parts ranging from 18 x 18 x 10 inches, 2015.


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Jonathan Baldock at Nicelle Beauchene Gallery




British artist Jonathan Baldock’s soft sculptures channel both Louise Bourgeois’ use of soft fabric to create unnerving characters and Barbara Hepworth’s rounded, organic sculptural forms to create cheery yet creepy totemic forms. (At Nicelle Beauchene Gallery through Feb 7th).

Mutter, steel, hessian, felt, thread, polystyrene, dolls eyes, brass, 65 ½ x 15 ¾ x 11 ½ inches, 2015.