Dieter Roth at Hauser & Wirth Gallery

Six hundred binders hold plastic sleeves filled with studio waste in a huge installation of books and other material created by Dieter Roth and his son and collaborator, Bjorn Roth currently at Hauser & Wirth Gallery in Chelsea. Every piece of trash less than 5mm thick found its way into a binder in the years 1975-76, resulting in a portrait of the artist told through postcards, cigarette butts, packaging and more. ‘The worse it looks, the better,’ Roth noted on one binder. (On view through July 29th).

Installation view of ‘Books. Dieter Roth. Bjorn Roth. Studio,’ Hauser and Wirth Gallery, April 27 – July 28, 2017.

Sol LeWitt at Paula Cooper Gallery

Sol LeWitt’s Wall Drawing #368 appears to pulse and move as it surrounds visitors to Paula Cooper Gallery. In addition to the physical impact, there’s also appeal in imagining the various ways LeWitt’s instructions (as enumerated in the drawing’s title) could be interpreted. (In Chelsea through Oct 22nd).

Sol LeWitt, Wall Drawing #368:  The wall is divided vertically into five equal parts.  The center part is divided horizontally and vertically into four equal parts.  Within each part are three-inch (7.5 cm) wide parallel bands of lines in four directions in four colors.  In each of the other parts, three-inch (7.5 cm) bands of lines in one of the four directions.  The bands are drawn in color and India ink washes.  Red, yellow, blue, ink, India ink 3” (7.5 cm) bands.  First drawn by:  Jo Watanabe and others.  First installation:  Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN, January 1982. India ink. dimensions variable.
Sol LeWitt, Wall Drawing #368: The wall is divided vertically into five equal parts. The center part is divided horizontally and vertically into four equal parts. Within each part are three-inch (7.5 cm) wide parallel bands of lines in four directions in four colors. In each of the other parts, three-inch (7.5 cm) bands of lines in one of the four directions. The bands are drawn in color and India ink washes. Red, yellow, blue, ink, India ink 3” (7.5 cm) bands. First drawn by: Jo Watanabe and others. First installation: Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN, January 1982. India ink. dimensions variable.

Regina Silveira at Alexander Gray Associates

A flood of frogs (vinyl silhouttes adhered to walls and floor) escape down a fake drain in Brazilian artist Regina Silveira’s space-bending installation at Alexander Gray Associates. Referencing Biblical plagues and unexpected, underground activity, the frogs suggest that above-ground life is only half of the story. (In Chelsea through March 26th.)

Regina Silveira, Amphibia, vinyl and metal grate, dimensions variable, 2013.  Installation view at Alexander Gray Associates, Feb ’16.
Regina Silveira, Amphibia, vinyl and metal grate, dimensions variable, 2013. Installation view at Alexander Gray Associates, Feb ’16.

Lisa Oppenheim at Tanya Bonakdar Gallery




It’s important to know but hard to guess how New York artist Lisa Oppenheim sources the materials she uses to make her images – in this case, swirling clouds or monstrous faces that emerge from book matched wood. Using a thin sheet of veneer from Eastern Red Cedar, the artist created a camera-less photogram, which she then framed in Eastern Red Cedar and in birch, a wood used to imitate cedar. (At Tanya Bonakdar Gallery through Feb 20th).

Lisa Oppenheim, Landscape Portraits (Eastern Red Cedar)(Version I), set of four silver gelatin photograms in Eastern Red Cedar and Birch frames, 51 5/8 x 55 inches, 2015.


Pierre Huyghe at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

The most understated Met Museum Roof Garden commission in recent memory, French artist Pierre Huyghe’s installation features a chunk of bedrock set on the museum’s stone tile roof within site of a tank populated with primordial-looking tadpole shrimp. In contrast to the spectacle of luxury condo growth seen just south of the park, the low-key intervention on the Met’s roof is almost disorienting. Weeds sprouting from removed floor tiles suggest a dereliction far from the norm, a crack in the Met’s perfect public face. (At the Metropolitan Museum of Art through Nov 11th).

Pierre Huyghe, Roof Garden commission at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2015.